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Dominant Caste and Territory in South India
1:01:23

Dominant Caste and Territory in South India

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  • Duration: 1:01:23
  • Updated: 13 Nov 2013
  • views: 148977
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Dalel Benbabaali recently completed a Ph.D. in social geography focused on dominant caste and territory in South India from University of Paris Ouest-Nanterre. She has taught at the Sorbonne and is currently in a postdoctoral position at the Department of Anthropology of the London School of Economics and Political Science as part of the international research program, "Inequality and Poverty in India: Dalits and Adivasis." Benbabaali is working on a book on the Kamma caste based on her doctoral thesis.
https://wn.com/Dominant_Caste_And_Territory_In_South_India
Le Corbusier Scholar Hernán Marchant
4:53

Le Corbusier Scholar Hernán Marchant

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  • Duration: 4:53
  • Updated: 25 Mar 2011
  • views: 378
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College of Design Associate Dean of Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies Hernán Marchant talks about his research as a Le Corbusier scholar wrapping up his dissertation at La Sorbonne in Paris, France.
https://wn.com/Le_Corbusier_Scholar_Hernán_Marchant
Math Day at Paris-Sorbonne University Abu Dhabi - Part 2
57:00

Math Day at Paris-Sorbonne University Abu Dhabi - Part 2

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  • Duration: 57:00
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2015
  • views: 122
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The primary objective of the U.A.E. Math Day was to bring together mathematicians from UAE and surrounding areas to a forum in which they can exchange research ideas in different branches of mathematics and communicate recent developments in mathematical research and education.
https://wn.com/Math_Day_At_Paris_Sorbonne_University_Abu_Dhabi_Part_2
Antipode video abstract (Jordanna Matlon)
3:27

Antipode video abstract (Jordanna Matlon)

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  • Duration: 3:27
  • Updated: 23 Jan 2014
  • views: 780
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Link to article: http://goo.gl/QenqzS In this video Jordanna discusses her forthcoming article in Antipode 46:3, "Narratives of Modernity, Masculinity and Citizenship amid Crisis in Abidjan's Sorbonne." She situates the Sorbonne, a public speaking area in the center of Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, within the context of the political and military conflict that led to its rise and ultimate demise. Next, she positions the Sorbonne as a social space where men reframed the crisis narrative and their place in it, drawing on a legacy of Abidjan as the "Paris of West Africa" to articulate themes of modernity, masculinity and citizenship. Literally and ideologically, predominantly un- and underemployed men centered themselves from the global and urban periphery. They enacted hyperbolized modern masculinities in opposition to their former French colonizers and migrants from regional countries. Jordanna divides her article in two parts. In the first, she reviews the crisis literature in the African city with a focus on informality and gendered conceptions of work. In the second, she analyzes Sorbonne sociality under the rubric of politics, a space where men placed themselves and the city at the center of global affairs; poverty, a place where men shared in their experience of poverty while simultaneously generating fantasized identities within a community of insiders; and penises, a masculinist and misogynist space where men asserted their rightful place in the city as men and citizens. Jordanna is a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse. She studies the livelihoods and lifestyles of men in Abidjan's informal economy. In addition to Antipode she has published in, among other places, Poetics, Contexts, Ethnography, The Black Scholar, Global Dialogue and The Africa Report. She is currently preparing her book manuscript, tentatively titled, "'I will be VIP!': Culture, politics and masculinity on neoliberalism's periphery." Links to videos about the Sorbonne: Afrique Arte, "À la Sorbonne." http://afrique.arte.tv/blog/?o=3540&oimage=&otitle=Qui%20est%20CAN%20?&p=3494 La Dépêche d'Abidjan, "Il était une fois 'La Sorbonne.'" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsTdgCG8emA abidjannetTV, "La Sorbonne, (forum Pro Gbagbo) completement détruite par les agents de la Marie du Plateau." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZ5xFtIPhU4 Special thanks to Carlos Carmonamedina for producing this video.
https://wn.com/Antipode_Video_Abstract_(Jordanna_Matlon)
Angela Davis Immortal
8:56

Angela Davis Immortal

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  • Duration: 8:56
  • Updated: 01 Mar 2018
  • views: 471
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Angela Davis is an activist, scholar and writer who advocates for the oppressed. She has authored several books, including Women, Culture & Politics. Born on January 26, 1944, in Birmingham, Alabama, became a master scholar who studied at the Sorbonne. She joined the U.S. Communist Party and was jailed for charges related to a prison outbreak, though ultimately cleared. Known for books like Women, Race & Class, she has worked as a professor and activist who advocates gender equity, prison reform and alliances across color lines. Subscribe, Comment, Like and Share SUBSCRIBE TO THE PATREON CHANNEL https://www.patreon.com/blackangelmedia ❤️ If you would like to Help Support this channel please Donate ❤️ https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=PYJG39LLM7RLG Donate Bitcoin to this channel @ 1AMmFLhCfRoQA3xVUeP2VFsndHbjVgD74g Donate Eth to this channel @ 0x0b67F122b2658bfBb6649bD15A2c7E526B63BA14
https://wn.com/Angela_Davis_Immortal
Saving Lives with Music: Here is What I Learned | Jean-Paul Destarac | TEDxIESEBarcelona
16:42

Saving Lives with Music: Here is What I Learned | Jean-Paul Destarac | TEDxIESEBarcelona

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  • Duration: 16:42
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2018
  • views: 124
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If you had skills and the means to help, how would you use it for the good of others? Jean-Paul shares with us the way by which he did it - through his passion - music. Jean Paul is a current full-time MBA student at IESE Business School in Barcelona, Spain. Previously, Jean Paul spent two years in research and analytics at Merrill Lynch while studying the European debt crisis funded by various fellowships and grants. At Southern Methodist University, he studied Economics with a specialization in Financial Applications, Markets and Culture, and French, graduating with Liberal Arts Honors as a Hunt Scholar. Jean-Paul complemented his academic program at SMU through additional studies at Oxford University, the Sorbonne, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and the Juilliard School. While in High School, Jean Paul started and ran a charity project in which he arranged, recorded, and produced two CDs of his own music to raise funds to support children in Guatemala suffering from cancer and unable to finance their treatments. His CDs have helped support Ayudame a Vivir (Help me to Live), a non-profit foundation in Guatemala. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
https://wn.com/Saving_Lives_With_Music_Here_Is_What_I_Learned_|_Jean_Paul_Destarac_|_Tedxiesebarcelona
Diana Taylor | Labyrinth of Things || Radcliffe Institute
49:35

Diana Taylor | Labyrinth of Things || Radcliffe Institute

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  • Duration: 49:35
  • Updated: 10 Apr 2015
  • views: 1430
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Diana Taylor, scholar of Latin American and US theater and performance, speaks about the play Bom Retiro 958 metros and its broad societal statement about the accumulation and transformation of things. Taylor is a University Professor, Performance Studies and Spanish, and Founding Director, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, New York University. Introduction by Martin Puchner, Byron and Anita Wien Professor of Drama and of English and Comparative Literature and Chair of the Committee on Dramatics, Harvard University.
https://wn.com/Diana_Taylor_|_Labyrinth_Of_Things_||_Radcliffe_Institute
Future Learning Places. Physical, digital or both? Labster, Kiron & UPMC Sorbonne Universities
11:19

Future Learning Places. Physical, digital or both? Labster, Kiron & UPMC Sorbonne Universities

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  • Duration: 11:19
  • Updated: 19 Dec 2016
  • views: 128
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Learning Places of the Future - Part III How will we learn? Combining digital and physical learning In this documentation we take a look at new campus projects, virtual learning environments and how to combine digital and on-site learning. From France's leading science campus UPMC into the virtual labs of Danish start-up Labster. To blended learning for refugees with Kiron University. including: * Labster - award winning start-up on virtual laboratory simulations * Kiron - online university for refugees * UPMC Sorbonne Universities - France's leading science university Authors: Corinna von Bodisco, René Dettmann produced by http://www.elig.org in collaboration with CapDigital http://edfab.fr/
https://wn.com/Future_Learning_Places._Physical,_Digital_Or_Both_Labster,_Kiron_Upmc_Sorbonne_Universities
GREETINGS FROM TSUUR MASTER
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GREETINGS FROM TSUUR MASTER

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  • Duration: 3:24
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2015
  • views: 1452
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Mikhail Magsarjav Santaro S. Magsarjav was the director of Paris Research Center for Chinese and Mongolian Studies for 27 years, until the closing of the Center in 2002. Santaro holds two superior Graduate Degrees on Mongolian Studies at the Sorbonne University including the Superior Degree, and study affiliation with the School of Higher Social Studies. After 1990 Santaro was Scholar in Residence at the Academy of of Sciences of Inner Mongolia, China, for 12 years, and remain a research affiliate until this day. Santaro went to France from Hong Kong in 1971 after he completed his studies in Chinese Medicine for which he holds Graduate and Post Graduate diplomas in Acupuncture and Moxibustion. Santaro introduced Acupuncture Anesthesia to the French medical world and worked in a Clinic near Paris and a Hospital in Paris, as a consultant to French doctors, and translator of ancient Chinese and Mongolian texts in medicine. S. Magsarjav was the Consultant for the Medical Editors Librairie Maloine (Paris) in the 1970's and 1980's. One of his own publications is called 'Acupuncture par l'Oreille', edited by Maloine in 1974. Several of Magsarjav’s works were acquired by the Bibliothèque Nationale de France. They are in French, English, Mongolian and Chinese.
https://wn.com/Greetings_From_Tsuur_Master
The Many Pasts of Britain: Antiquarian Studies in the 17th Century
1:00:58

The Many Pasts of Britain: Antiquarian Studies in the 17th Century

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  • Duration: 1:00:58
  • Updated: 11 May 2015
  • views: 144
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02-04-2015 Institute of Historical Research Paris-Sorbonne University http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://www.history.ac.uk/podcasts/franco-british-history-external Institute: http://www.history.ac.uk The Many Pasts of Britain: Antiquarian Studies in the 17th Century Graham Parry (University of York) Graham Perry, Emeritus Professor of Renaissance Studies at the University of York, will talk on 'The Many Pasts of Britain: the Rise of Antiquarian Studies in the 17th Century'. As new models of scholarship entered England in the middle of Elizabeth's reign, scholars began to take a more critical approach to the origins of Britain. Who were the ancestors of the English? Where did they come from? What language did they speak? What was their way of life, their religious beliefs? The traditional views of the British past became discredited, as more systematic methods of enquiry were introduced. After William Camden's seminal book 'Britannia' was published in 1586, a new type of scholar began to emerge: the antiquary. The achievements of men such as John Selden, James Ussher, William Dugdale and John Aubrey will be briefly assessed, and their (often surprising) discoveries will be presented, for the enjoyment of a modern audience. Graham Parry is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. Franco-British History seminar series
https://wn.com/The_Many_Pasts_Of_Britain_Antiquarian_Studies_In_The_17Th_Century
The Nature of Reality - Theory of Relativity, Quantum Science and Buddhist Thought 1/2
1:11:24

The Nature of Reality - Theory of Relativity, Quantum Science and Buddhist Thought 1/2

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  • Duration: 1:11:24
  • Updated: 21 Sep 2013
  • views: 264182
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Part 2/2 here: http://youtu.be/RSJ08E2ntQo Program of this Afternoon: Brief introduction 0:46 (part 1/2) Presentation 1: Arthur Zajonc on the Theory of Relativity (Galileos primary and secondary qualities and a thought-experiment about relativity). 40:00 (part 1/2) Presentation 2: Michel Bitbol "Quantum Mechanics: A theory with no view of the world?" (What is science? What is a physical theory? ...from Aristoteles to Niels Bohr. How to interprete a theory? What is quantum theory?) Beginning part 2/2: The Dalai Lama made comments to the last Presentation ("Let's shake hands!") 12:34 (part 2/2): Geshe Thupten Jinpa (with additions from the Dalai Lama): Parallels in the Buddhist Thought to the two Presentations (Theories of the atom) 50:02(part 2/2): The Dalai Lama answers Questions and made some Comments to the Issues of this Afternoon (Role of the brain, consciousness and energy, philosophical implications: "my secret", ethical dimension and "quantum science -gurus". "Mind and Life" XXVI "Mind, Brain and Matter" (Day 2 afternoon), Drepung Monastery, Mundgod, India (January 18, 2013) PARTICIPANTS Tenzin Gyatso His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama Arthur Zajonc, PhD Arthur Zajonc was professor of physics at Amherst College from 1978 to 2012, when he became President of the Mind & Life Institute. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Michigan. He has been visiting professor and research scientist at the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris, the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics, and the universities of Rochester, and Hannover. He has been Fulbright professor at the University of Innsbruck in Austria. Michel Bitbol, PhD Michel Bitbol is presently Directeur de recherché at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, in Paris, France. He is based at the Centre de Recherche en Epistemologie Appliquee (CREA) in Paris He teaches the Philosophy of Modern Physics to graduate students at the University Paris I (Pantheon-Sorbonne). He was educated at several universities in Paris, where he received successively his M.D. in 1980, his Ph.D. in physics and biophysics in 1985, and his "Habilitation" in philosophy in 1997. Geshe Thupten Jinpa Geshe Thupten Jinpa is the principal English translator to the Dalai Lama since 1985. He has translated and edited more than ten books by the Dalai Lama including The World of Tibetan Buddhism (Wisdom Publications, 1993), A Good Heart: A Buddhist Perspective on the Teachings of Jesus (Wisdom Publications, 1996), and the New York Times bestseller Ethics for the New Millennium (Riverhead, 1999). Geshe Thupten Jinpa was born in Tibet in 1958. He received his early education and training as a monk at Zongkar Chöde Monastery in South India and later joined the Shartse College of Ganden monastic university, South India, where he received the Geshe Lharam degree. He taught Buddhist epistemology, metaphysics, Middle Way philosophy and Buddhist psychology at Ganden for five years. Jinpa also holds B.A. Honors degree in Western Philosophy and a Ph.D. degree in Religious Studies, both from Cambridge University, UK. Over the last several years, largely through the work of the Emory-Tibet Science Initiative, Science for Monks, and Science Meets Dharma, science instruction has been given to a small group of monastic scholars. Very recently, the decision was made to require science education for Geshe degrees at Tibetan monastic universities, and to facilitate all monastic students being introduced to modern science and the profound philosophical and ethical issues raised by science and technology. In recognition of this fact, this conference is taking place at one of the historically important Tibetan academic institutions, Drepung Monastery in Mundgod, India (Mind & Life Institute, 2013). In this video, i had cut out some passages with long traductions to the tibetan language (only in part 1/2). See also "The Dalai Lama and Quantum Physics (2007)" here: http://youtu.be/ALGKIcfXxcM and the Playlist "The Dalai Lama and Quantum Physics (Dialogues with Scientists 2007 & 2013)" here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2hFkpAxioqiIRC9N4IaB8keOkpIsCJmM
https://wn.com/The_Nature_Of_Reality_Theory_Of_Relativity,_Quantum_Science_And_Buddhist_Thought_1_2
Gala Dinner for Global Clinical Scholars Research Program (GCSRT) Class 2016
29:51

Gala Dinner for Global Clinical Scholars Research Program (GCSRT) Class 2016

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  • Duration: 29:51
  • Updated: 04 Jun 2016
  • views: 255
videos https://wn.com/Gala_Dinner_For_Global_Clinical_Scholars_Research_Program_(Gcsrt)_Class_2016
Interview avec Julien Verceuil
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Interview avec Julien Verceuil

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  • Duration: 6:11
  • Updated: 03 May 2016
  • views: 205
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Interview avec Julien Vercueil, maître de conférence en Sciences Economiques à l'INALCO
https://wn.com/Interview_Avec_Julien_Verceuil
Ibn' Arabi - 'Alone with the Alone': Henry Corbin
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Ibn' Arabi - 'Alone with the Alone': Henry Corbin

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  • Duration: 5:56
  • Updated: 31 Mar 2015
  • views: 355676
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One of the 20th century’s most prolific scholars of Islamic mysticism, Henry Corbin (1903-1978) was Professor of Islam & Islamic Philosophy at the Sorbonne in Paris and at the University of Tehran. (Iran) Corbin’s central project was to provide a framework for understanding the unity of the religions of the Book: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. His great work: “Alone with the Alone: Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn ‘Arabi “is a classic initiatory text of visionary spirituality that transcends the tragic divisions among the three great monotheisms. Corbin’s life was devoted to the struggle to free the religious imagination from fundamentalisms of every kind. Mystic, philosopher, poet, sage, Muhyiddin Ibn 'Arabi is one of the world's great spiritual teachers. Ibn 'Arabi was born in Murcia, Spain in 1165 and his writings had an immense impact throughout the Islamic world and beyond. The universal ideas underlying his thought are of immediate relevance today. Music: Armand Amar
https://wn.com/Ibn'_Arabi_'Alone_With_The_Alone'_Henry_Corbin
Deisy Ventura em TEDxRuaMonteAlegre
18:24

Deisy Ventura em TEDxRuaMonteAlegre

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  • Duration: 18:24
  • Updated: 06 Dec 2013
  • views: 1972
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Professora de Direito Internacional e Livre-Docente do Instituto de Relações Internacionais da Universidade de São Paulo (IRI-USP). É Doutora em Direito Internacional e Mestre em Direito Comunitário e Europeu da Universidade de Paris 1, Panthéon-Sorbonne. Graduada em Direito e Mestre em Integração Latino-americana da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria. Exerceu a Cátedra Simon Bolívar do Instituto de Altos Estudos da América Latina da Universidade de Paris 3 (Sorbonne-Nouvelle, 2007), foi professora convidada de Sciences-Po Paris (Ciclo Iberoamericano de Poitiers, 2007) e convidada do Instituto de Altos Estudos Internacionais e do Desenvolvimento (IHEID) de Genebra no Programa Global South Scholar in Residence (2010-2011). É membro do NAP-DISA (Núcleo de Pesquisa em Direito Sanitário) e professora do Doutorado em Saúde Global e Sustentabilidade da Faculdade de Saúde Pública da USP. Foi Consultora Jurídica da Secretaria do Mercosul (Montevidéu, 2003-2006). Foi professora adjunta e Pró-Reitora de Assuntos Estudantis da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria. Publicou 15 livros nas áreas internacional (em particular Mercosul e União Européia) e de educação jurídica. Coordena o Grupo de Estudos sobre Internacionalização do Direito e Justiça de Transição (IDEJUST, convênio USP/Ministério da Justiça) e o projeto de extensão universitária Cosmópolis (parceria com a Prefeitura Municipal de São Paulo). Seus temas atuais de pesquisa são a permeabilidade entre Direito Internacional e interno, particularmente no campo da saúde global e da mobilidade humana; a Governança Regional (especialmente UNASUL) e a Educação (com ênfase no emprego da arte na formação do internacionalista). Professor of International Law and a postdoctoral Livre-Docente at the International Relations Institute of the University of São Paulo (IRI-USP). She has a Ph.D in International Law and a Masters in Community and European Law from the University of Paris 1, Panthéon-Sorbonne, as well as a Graduate Degree in Law and a Masters in Latin American Integration from the Federal University of Santa Maria. She has held the Simon Bolívar Chair at the Institute of Advanced Studies on Latin America of the University of Paris 3 (Sorbonne-Nouvelle, 2007), and was a visiting professor at Sciences-Po Paris (Ibero-American Cycle of Poitiers, 2007) and a visiting lecturer at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID), in Geneva, as part of the Global South Scholar in Residence Program (2010-2011). She is a member of NAP-DISA (Center of Research on Health Law) and a professor of the doctoral program on Global Health and Sustainability at the Public Health Faculty of the University of São Paulo (USP). Ventura has served as Legal Advisor to the Mercosur Secretariat (Montevideo, 2003-2006) and as Associate Professor and Dean of Student Affairs at the Federal University of Santa Maria. She has published 15 books on international topics (in particular Mercosur and European Union) and legal education. She coordinates the Study Group on Internationalization of Law and Transition Justice (IDEJUST, partnership between USP and the Ministry of Justice) and the university extension project Cosmópolis (partnership with the Municipal Government of São Paulo). Her current research topics include the permeability between international and national law, particularly in the field of global health and human mobility, as well as regional governance (particularly UNASUL) and education (with an emphasis on art in international relations training).
https://wn.com/Deisy_Ventura_Em_Tedxruamontealegre
[ENG SUB ] Dr. Ali Shariati on Guardianship of the Jurist
8:24

[ENG SUB ] Dr. Ali Shariati on Guardianship of the Jurist

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  • Duration: 8:24
  • Updated: 31 Oct 2011
  • views: 2583
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Doctor Ali Shariati was born in 1933 in Kahak (a village in Mazinan), a suburb of Sabzevar, found in northeastern Iran.[4] His father, Mohammad-Taqi, was a teacher and Islamic scholar, who opened in 1947 the 'Centre for the Propagation of Islamic Truths' in Mashhad, in the province of Khorasan,[5] a social Islamic forum which became embroiled in the oil nationalisation movement of the 1950s.[6] In his years at the Teacher's Training College in Mashhad, Shariati came into contact with young people who were from the less privileged economic classes of the society, and for the first time saw the poverty and hardship that existed in Iran during that period. At the same time he was exposed to many aspects of Western philosophical and political thought. He attempted to explain and provide solutions for the problems faced by Muslim societies through traditional Islamic principles interwoven with and understood from the point of view of modern sociology and philosophy. His articles from this period for the Mashhad daily newspaper, Khorasan, display his developing eclecticism and acquaintance with the ideas of modern Islamic and extra-Islamic thinkers such as Jamal al-Din al-Afghani, Muhammad Iqbal, Sigmund Freud and Alexis Carrel.[7] In 1952 he became a high-school teacher and founded the Islamic Students' Association, which led to his arrest after a demonstration. In 1953, the year of Mossadeq's overthrow, he became a member of the National Front. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Mashhad in 1955. In 1957 he was arrested again by the police, along with 16 other members of the National Resistance Movement. Ali Shariati then managed to obtain a scholarship for France, where he continued his graduate studies at the Sorbonne University. There he was considered a brilliant student and elected best student in letters in 1958. He worked towards earning his doctorate in sociology, leaving Paris after get PHD certificate at sociology in 1964. During this period in Paris, Shariati started collaborating with the Algerian National Liberation Front (FLN) in 1959. The next year, he began to read Frantz Fanon and translated an anthology of his work into Persian.[8] Shariati would introduce Fanon's thought into Iranian revolutionary émigrée circles. He was arrested in Paris during a demonstration in honour of Patrice Lumumba, on January 17, 1961. The same year he joined Ebrahim Yazdi, Mostafa Chamran and Sadegh Qotbzadeh in founding the Freedom Movement of Iran abroad. In 1962 he continued studying sociology and history of religions, and followed the courses of Islamic scholar Louis Massignon, Jacques Berque and the sociologist Georges Gurvitch. He also came to know the philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre that same year, and published in Iran Jalal Al-e Ahmad's book Gharbzadegi (or Occidentosis) . He then returned to Iran in 1964 where he was arrested and imprisoned for engaging in subversive political activities while in France. He was released after a few weeks, at which point he began teaching at the University of Mashhad. Shariati then went to Tehran where he began lecturing at the Hosseiniye Ershad Institute. These lectures proved to be hugely popular among his students and were spread by word of mouth throughout all economic sectors of the society, including the middle and upper classes where interest in Shariati's teachings began to grow immensely. Shariati's continued success again aroused the interest of the government, which arrested him, as well as many of his students. Widespread pressure from the populace and an international outcry eventually led to his release after eighteen months in solitary confinement, and he was released on March 20, 1975. Shariati was allowed to leave the country for England. He died three weeks later in a Southampton hospital under 'mysterious circumstances' although in Ali Rahnema's biography of Shariati, he is said to have died of a fatal heart attack. Shariati is buried next to his beloved Zaynab in Damascus, Syria where Iranian pilgrims frequently visit.
https://wn.com/Eng_Sub_Dr._Ali_Shariati_On_Guardianship_Of_The_Jurist
Familiar classics - Joaquín Rodrigo - Concierto de Aranjuez (1939) - II. Adagio
11:34

Familiar classics - Joaquín Rodrigo - Concierto de Aranjuez (1939) - II. Adagio

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  • Duration: 11:34
  • Updated: 20 Jun 2011
  • views: 10256
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History (based on materials from the Grove Dictionary of Music): Blind from the age of three, Spanish composer Joaquin Rodrigo (1901-1999) began his musical education at an early age, gradually progressing to studies at the Parisian Conservatoire and the Sorbonne. The early part of Rodrigo's life was spent almost exclusively in academician pursuits with only occasional compositions. However, when he returned to Spain in 1939 at the onset of the Second World War, he brought with him his first large-scale work which is presented in this case: the Concierto de Aranjuez, inspired by the gardens of the Palacio Real de Aranjuez. At that time Rodrigo was, it seems, a respected scholar but not an established maestro, a status which he attained with the triumphant premiere of the piece in question on the 9th of November, 1940, in Barcelona. Though the composer went on to compose 170 other works of more or less renown and attained numerous honors, including the de Falla Chair of Music at Complutense University (1947) and a membership at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes (1950), the Aranjuez would always remain the most recognizable achievement of Rodrigo's musical career, demonstrated by the conferment to Rodrigo's family of the hereditary title "Marqueses de los Jardines de Aranjuez" in 1992. Music: Rodrigo's music is a perfect representation of the neoclassical school which, in opposition to modernism, uses established traditional forms and a clear, harmonic language entrenched deep within the idiom of the composer's country. All of these qualities are fully demonstrated in the haunting adagio of the Aranjuez which is, indeed, a most remarkable piece of music. Other orchestral pieces by Rodrigo are, sadly, curiously lacking in the deep inspiration of the presented piece, providing some Spanish color but only occasionally recalling the dramatic power of the Aranjuez (composed, as his wife later declared in an autobiography, as a response to the devastation at the miscarriage of her first pregnancy). Even the Aranjuez itself is remarkably unbalanced, both the opening and the concluding sections of the work sounding trite in comparison to the mesmerizing central lament. A simple accompaniment of a repeated chord for the guitar and sustained gusts for the remaining orchestra, enriched by a number of graceful touches, such as the affecting descent of the violas (0:35), serves as the basis for the mourning main theme in two parts, passed between the English horn (0:14, 1:26) and the guitar (0:50, 2:03), the later lightly ornamenting the melody which is treated as an idee fixe during the whole movement. A brief crescendo, instigated by an upward figuration of the violins/violas (2:42), melts away, as a trill from the English horn (3:04) leads into a reflective cadential passage - a secondary theme as it were - for the guitar over a sighing motive in the strings. What follows then is a remarkable juxtaposition of the orchestra, demanding a return to the main theme (3:49, 4:04, 4:19), and the guitar, relentlessly continuing the lyric second motive which gradually begins to unravel (3:56, 4:10). The following section is an exposition of the main theme by solo guitar, developed in the manner of an echo (4:33-5:48). The orchestra's return, in a chilling tremor of the oboe/strings provokes a jagged, pain-infused ascending line from the soloist (5:57, 6:15). A crescendo is seemingly established (6:27), as a combination of the winds' flutter, lone chords of the guitar and the rising lines of the strings suggest a return to the main theme, however, the orchestra's outpouring dissolves into a single sustained note (6:37), accentuated by the oboe/bassoon, as a second solo for the guitar follows, the soloist playing the main theme in a wildly ornamented variant (6:50-7:47). A virtuoso cadenza develops from the theme (7:48-8:49), until, after a series of alternating statements by the orchestra and solo guitar (8:50), the movement's culmination is reached in a complete orchestral version of the principal melody, played primarily by the string section and the horns, while the remaining winds repeatedly state the familiar ascending figuration (8:58). The flute soon takes up the main theme in a most caressing manner (10:09), passing it, unfinished, to the guitar which presents an echo variation of the theme over the strings' sustained lines (10:23), as the guitar's voice fades away in a luminous string codetta. All in all, one of the most gratifying pieces of modern music. Score: Sadly, no complete set of sheet music for the presented piece can be found in open access at the moment. Recording: The 1994 Philips recording of the Aranjuez features a most gratifying performing team of guitarist Pepe Romero (of the Los Romeros ensemble) and the familiar Academy of St. Martin in the Fields under Sir Neville Marriner. Hope you'll enjoy =).
https://wn.com/Familiar_Classics_Joaquín_Rodrigo_Concierto_De_Aranjuez_(1939)_Ii._Adagio
Rosi Brandotti - Critical complexity sattelite meeting Brussels 2012
2:51

Rosi Brandotti - Critical complexity sattelite meeting Brussels 2012

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  • Duration: 2:51
  • Updated: 18 Sep 2012
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Rosi Braidotti (B.A. Hons. Australian National University, 1978; PhD Cum Laude, Université de Paris, Panthéon-Sorbonne, 1981; Senior Fulbright Scholar, 1994; Honorary Degree 'Philosophiae Doctrix Honoris Causa', University of Helsinki, 2007; Knight in the Order of the Netherlands Lion, 2005; Honorary Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, 2009) is Distinguished University Professor and founding Director of the Centre for the Humanities at Utrecht University. She was the founding professor of Gender Studies in the Humanities at Utrecht (1988-2005) and the first scientific director of the Netherlands Research School of Women's Studies. In 2005--2006, she was the Leverhulme Trust, Visiting Professorship in the Law School of Birckbeck College, University of London. In 2001--2003, she held the Jean Monnet Visiting Chair at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies of the European Institute in Florence. In 1994-1995 she was a fellow in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. An active international net worker, she set up in 1989 the Network of Interdisciplinary Women's Studies in Europe (NOISE) within the Erasmus Programme. From 1997 to 2005 she was the founding scientific director of the SOCRATES Thematic Network for European Women's Studies ATHENA, which was awarded in 2010 the Erasmus Prize of the Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Commission for outstanding contribution to social inclusion. In 2005- 2007 she was the founding Scientific Director of the Marie Curie Early Stage Training consortium 'Gender Graduates', funded by the Sixth Framework programme of the European Commission. In 2007-2008 she founded of the European Consortium for The Humanities in the Twenty-first Century; in 2009 she was elected to the Board of the International Consortium of Humanities Institutes and Centres (CHCI). Her books include: Nomadic Theory: the Portable Rosi Braidotti, New York: Columbia University Press, 2011b; Patterns of Dissonance. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1991; Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory, New York: Columbia Univ. Press, 1994; Metamorphoses: Towards a Materialist Theory of Becoming, Cambridge: Polity Press, 2002; Transpositions. On Nomadic Ethics, Cambridge : Polity Press, 2006 and La philosophie, lá où on ne l'attend pas, Paris : Larousse, 2009. In 2011 a thoroughly revised second edition of Nomadic Subjects (2011a) was published by Columbia University Press in New York.
https://wn.com/Rosi_Brandotti_Critical_Complexity_Sattelite_Meeting_Brussels_2012
Scholarship Facts & Tips : Getting Free Scholarships in France
0:59

Scholarship Facts & Tips : Getting Free Scholarships in France

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  • Duration: 0:59
  • Updated: 05 Jun 2009
  • views: 2116
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Getting free scholarships for studying abroad in France requires applying for a study abroad scholarship to fund or partially fund the trip to France. Search the Internet for more French scholarships with insight from a financial aid officer in this free video on scholarships and financial aid. Expert: Brooke Kramer Contact: www.argosy.edu Bio: Brooke Kramer is the financial aid officer at Argosy University in Salt Lake City, Utah. Filmmaker: Michael Burton
https://wn.com/Scholarship_Facts_Tips_Getting_Free_Scholarships_In_France
Venerable Walpola Rahula
23:07

Venerable Walpola Rahula

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  • Duration: 23:07
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2014
  • views: 2295
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Venerable Walpola Rahula a Buddhist monk, scholar and writer is one of the most exemplary and eminent Sri Lankan intellectuals of the 20th century.In 1964, he became the Professor of History and Religions at Northwestern University-USA, thus becoming the first bhikkhu to hold a professorial chair in the Western world. He also once held the position of Vice-Chancellor at the then Vidyodaya University (currently known as the University of Sri Jayewardenepura). He has written extensively about Buddhism in English, French and Sinhalese. His book, What the Buddha Taught, is considered by many to be one of the best books written about Theravada Buddhism. Venerable Rahula attended Ceylon university (now known as the University of Colombo). He obtained a B.A. Honours degree (London), and then earned a Doctorate of Philosophy, having written a thesis on the History of Buddhism in Sri Lanka (Ceylon). Then he went on to study Indian Philosophy at Calcutta University and later studied Mahayana at the Sorbonne. It was during his time at the Sorbonne in the late 1950s that he produced What the Buddha Taught, a highly regarded introductory text on Buddhism, for which he is best known. Venerable Rahula is the first Buddhist monk to become a professor in a Western University. When he became Professor of History and Literature of Religions there were no Theravada Temples in the United States. He later became a Professor Emeritus at the same University. Rahula also held positions at several other American Universities. He was a visiting lecturer at Swarthmore College and Regents Lecturer at UCLA. He became Vice-Chancellor of Vidyoda University (now Sri Jayawardhanapura University) in 1964. He was later instrumental in encouraging the formation of the first Theravada temple in the United States, the Washington Vihara. Rahula was awarded several titles during his lifetime. The highest honorary title, Tripitakavagisvaracarya (Supreme Master of Buddhist Scriptures), was given him by Sri Kalyapi Samagri Sangha-sabha (the Chapter of the Sangha in Sri Lanka) in 1965, with the qualification Sri (Gracious), a title held by only two or three scholars in Sri Lanka. He was also awarded the title "Aggamaha Panditha" from Burma and other honers from France.
https://wn.com/Venerable_Walpola_Rahula
An Ethics Lesson with Michael Sandel on Q&A March 2018
11:51

An Ethics Lesson with Michael Sandel on Q&A March 2018

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  • Duration: 11:51
  • Updated: 28 Mar 2018
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Monday 26 March, 2018 A Night with Michael Sandel http://www.abc.net.au/tv/qanda/txt/s4808926.htm Michael Sandel teaches political philosophy at Harvard University. He has been described as “the most relevant living philosopher,” a “rock-star moralist,”(Newsweek) and “currently the most popular professor in the world.”(Die Zeit) His writings—on justice, ethics, democracy, and markets–have been translated into 27 languages. His legendary course “Justice” is the first Harvard course to be made freely available online and on television. It has been viewed by tens of millions of people around the world, including in China, where Michael was named the “most influential foreign figure of the year.” (China Newsweek) Michael’s books relate the big questions of political philosophy to the most vexing issues of our time. They include What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets; Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?; The Case against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering; and Democracy’s Discontent: America in Search of a Public Philosophy. His BBC series “The Public Philosopher” explores the philosophical ideas lying behind the headlines with audiences around the world, including a discussion of violence against women, recorded in India, and a debate about democracy in Britain’s Parliament. In Brazil, he recently led a debate on corruption and the ethics of everyday life that reached an audience of 19 million on Globo TV. On NHK, Japan’s national television network, he led a discussion with students from China, Japan, and South Korea on history and moral responsibility. Michael has been a pioneer in the use of new technology to promote global public discourse. In a new BBC series, “The Global Philosopher” Michael leads video-linked discussions with participants from over 30 countries on issues such as immigration and climate change. Michael has been a visiting professor at the Sorbonne, delivered the Tanner Lectures on Human Values at Oxford, and given the Kellogg Lecture on Jurisprudence at the U.S. Library of Congress. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he received his doctorate from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. Michael’s lecture tours have taken him across five continents and packed such venues as St. Paul’s Cathedral (London), the Sydney Opera House (Australia), and an outdoor stadium in Seoul (S. Korea), where 14,000 people came to hear him speak.
https://wn.com/An_Ethics_Lesson_With_Michael_Sandel_On_Q_A_March_2018
#16 Thich Nhat Hanh - Trusting The Buddha Within
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#16 Thich Nhat Hanh - Trusting The Buddha Within

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  • Duration: 26:44
  • Updated: 02 Jul 2016
  • views: 9563
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Thich Nhat Hanh is a Zen master in the Vietnamese tradition and a scholar, poet, and peace activist. He is the founder of the Van Hanh Buddhist University in Saigon and has taught at Columbia University and the Sorbonne. Thich Nhat Hanh is the author of the national bestseller Living Buddha, Living Christ and over 60 other books. He was nominated for the 1967 Nobel Peace Prize by Martin Luther King, Jr. This special feature of the Meditation Summit is an excerpt from an archival recording with Thich Nhat Hanh from Body and Mind Are One: A Training in Mindfulness. Here, he discusses how to trust in the living presence of the Buddha as a guide for our daily practice. This session explores: • How to recognize an awakened being through the quality of their actions • Letting the Buddha do the work for us when things get overwhelming • “Inviting the Buddha Within,” a guided meditation for resting in the present moment
https://wn.com/16_Thich_Nhat_Hanh_Trusting_The_Buddha_Within
Inessential Colors: A History of Color in Architectural Drawings, 16th–19th Centuries
1:07:59

Inessential Colors: A History of Color in Architectural Drawings, 16th–19th Centuries

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  • Duration: 1:07:59
  • Updated: 06 Feb 2018
  • views: 12
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Since 2007, Basile Baudez has been Maître de Conférences in heritage studies and architectural history at Université Paris-Sorbonne, Paris IV. For the 2015–2016 year he was a Visiting Scholar in the History of Art Department at the University of Pennsylvania. His research has been supported by fellowships from CASVA at the National Gallery of Art and the Getty Research Institute. He received his PhD from the École Pratique des Hautes Études in 2006 and published his dissertation at the Presses Universitaires de Rennes under the title Architecture et tradition académique au siècle des Lumières. His main areas of research are the history of architectural schools and the Beaux-Arts system as well as the history of architectural representation in the Western world. He co-edited a monograph on Les Hôtels de la Guerre et des Affaires étrangères à Versailles (Paris: Chaudun, 2010) and a volume Chalgrin et son temps: architectes et architecture de d’Ancien Régime à la Révolution (Bordeaux: William Blake & co., 2016). He has published extensively, including in La Revue de l’Art, Metropolitan Museum Journal, Journal of Art Historiography, Bulletin Monumental, The Burlington Magazine, and Livraisons d’Histoire de l’Architecture. He curated the exhibition À la Source de l’Antique (2011) at the École des Beaux-Arts, devoted to Italian, Russian, and French neoclassical architectural drawings, and he co-curated, with Nicholas Olsberg, the exhibition Civic Utopia, France 1765–1837 (2016-2017) at the Courtauld Institute of Art. His current book project addresses the history of color in architectural representation from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century. Architectural historians have focused on the history of drawing primarily as a project design tool. By applying the methods of art history, this talk traces color as a key player in the long history of rivalry and exchange between European traditions in architectural drawing and practice. While Italian Renaissance drawings were largely monochrome and developed their conventions under pressure from engravers, seventeenth-century European drawings are characterized by a contrast between a colorful German and Dutch world—developed around architect-painters’ designs that influenced French and Spanish draughtsmanship—and a still largely monochrome tradition in Italy and England. At the end of Louis XIV’s reign, French architects adopted color conventions taken from engineers, largely for informational purposes. In the middle of the eighteenth century, however, a color revolution took place, one in which a new generation of architects who were working alongside painters developed a wide chromatic range that was no longer limited to informing the worker but to persuading academic juries and gaining commissions. This eighteenth-century French employment of color laid the foundation for Beaux-Arts architectural drawings in the first half of the nineteenth century, at a moment when English architectural drawings also adopted color in response to the English watercolor movement.
https://wn.com/Inessential_Colors_A_History_Of_Color_In_Architectural_Drawings,_16Th–19Th_Centuries
University of Paris
28:50

University of Paris

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  • Duration: 28:50
  • Updated: 28 Aug 2014
  • views: 1378
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The University of Paris (French: Université de Paris), often known as the Sorbonne or la Sorbonne, was noted as one of the first universities to be established in Europe. It was founded in the mid-12th century in Paris, France, officially recognized between 1160 and 1250. Following the French Revolution, its activities were suspended from 1793 to 1896. With the growth of higher education in the postwar years in France, in 1970 the university was divided into thirteen autonomous institutions. The university is often referred to the Sorbonne after the collegiate institution (Collège de Sorbonne) founded around 1257 by Robert de Sorbon, but it was always larger than the Sorbonne. Of the thirteen current successor universities, four have premises in the historical Sorbonne building, and three of them include "Sorbonne" in their names. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
https://wn.com/University_Of_Paris